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Covid-19 Update 4th June 2020

Thursday, 4 June 2020 12:25:48 Europe/London

 

Issued at 12:00 4th June 2020

 

Lantoom has remained open for business throughout the Coronavirus epidemic. However the risk remains high. Currently 1 in 40 people in the general population tests positive for the virus and to minimise the risk to our staff and others we continue to limit visits to the quarry to those which are essential

 

Lantoom remains open for business subject to certain conditions:

1. Customers wishing to visit our office or collect materials are requested to:
 
(a) Confirm that your are healthy, do not have a high temperature or other COVID-19 symptoms.
(b) Confirm that you have not recently travelled overseas or been in contact with anyone who has COVID-19 symptoms
(c) Consider whether the visit is essential.  Can you order by telephone or email or use our website ?
(d) Contact us by email or telephone before your visit. If we can help you without the need to visit, we will do so.
If a visit is essentail we will make an appointment for you.
 
Customers who just turn up without making a prior appointment will be turned away.  This enables us to control the visitor numbers to maintain social distancing and prevent delays.
 
(c) If your visit is unavoidable, obey our Infection Prevention and Control instructions on arrival.
 
2. Our staff in vulnerable groups remain shielded and working at home.  We are also minimising the risk to other staff by their working at home, where possible.  Consequently we have fewer office staff than normal working at the quarry.
3. Our telephone, e-mail, and website customer support is fully operational.
4. If at all possible, please telephone or contact us by email or through our website to minimise infection risk.
5. We are able to arrange deliveries.
6. Delivery drivers must not get out of their vehicles on arrival at the quarry and telephone our office for instructions from their cab.
7. We remain well stocked with all categories of materials.
8.  To minimise infection risk we are not accepting cash payments until further notice
 

 Lantoom will continue to operate within Government Guidance and review operations according to the situation.

 
You may contact us through the following methods:

Email:  sales@lantoom.co.uk

Website:  www.lantoom.co.uk

Telephone:  01579 308234

 

Thank you for your business.  Please minimise infection risk.  The response to COVID-19 is long term and we appreciate your help in adapting to the disease risk. 

Comments | Posted By Richard Crocker

 

Issued at 15:00 27 March 2020

 

Lantoom remains open for business but subject to specified conditions and at a reduced staffing level. Most of our staff are now either working from home or have been sent home on short term paid leave.

 

The UK Government issued Guidance that prohibits going outside the home except in prescribed circumstances. Travel to and from work remains permitted, where work cannot be done from home. Guidance has also been issued which requires certain workplaces to close. Construction sites and quarries are not required to close.

 

Lantoom remains open for business subject to certain conditions:

 

1. We have adapted our working procedures to manage the risk of COVID-19 infection at Lantoom.
2. Quarries are multi hazard environments and we are well prepared for managing health and safety risks.
3. Staff in vulnerable groups have been isolated at home.
4. Where possible other staff are working from home.
5. Most of our production staff have been sent home on leave. Those that remain are not permitted contact with visitors.
6. Our telephone, e-mail, and website customer support remain fully operational.
7. If at all possible, please telephone or contact us by email or through our website to minimise infection risk.
8. Customers wishing to visit our office or collect materials are asked to:
(a) Consider whether the visit is essential.
(b) Contact us by email or telephone prior to visiting. If we can help you without the need to visit, we will do so.
(c) If a visit is unavoidable, obey our Infection Prevention and Control instructions on arrival.
12. We are able to arrange deliveries.
13. Delivery drivers must not get out of their vehicles on arrival at the quarry and telephone our office for instructions from their cab.
14. We remain well stocked with all categories of materials.
15. Prices are being affected by the drop in the value of Sterling and we are having to implement price increases to reflect our higher costs.

 

Lantoom will continue to operate within Government Guidance and review operations according to the situation.
 
You may contact us through the following methods:

Email:  sales@lantoom.co.uk

Website:  www.lantoom.co.uk

Telephone:  01579 308234

 

Thank you for your business.  Please do not panic.  Please minimise infection risk.  The response to COVID-19 is likely to be long term and we appreciate your help in adapting to the disease risk. 

Comments | Posted By Adam Ashman

 

Issued at 14:00 24 March 2020

 

Last night the UK Government issued Guidance that prohibits going outside the home except in prescribed circumstances. Travel to and from work remains permitted, where work cannot be done from home.


Guidance has also been issued which requires certain workplaces to close. Construction sites and quarries are not required to close. Consequently Lantoom remains open for business subject to certain conditions.
 
1. We have adapted our working procedures to manage the risk of COVID-19 infection at Lantoom.
2. Quarries are multi hazard environments and we are well prepared for managing health and safety risks.
3. Staff in vulnerable groups have been isolated at home.
4. Where possible other staff are working from home.
5. Our production staff are not permitted contact with visitors.
6. Our telephone, e-mail, and website customer support remain fully operational.
7. If at all possible, please telephone or contact us by email or through our website to minimise infection risk.
8. Customers wishing to visit our office or collect materials are asked to:
9. (a) Consider whether the visit is essential.
10. (b) Contact us by email or telephone prior to visiting. If we can help you without the need to visit, we will do so.
11. (c) If a visit is unavoidable, obey our Infection Prevention and Control instructions on arrival.
12. We are able to arrange deliveries.
13. Delivery drivers must not get out of their vehicles on arrival at the quarry and telephone our office for instructions from their cab.
14. We remain well stocked with all categories of materials.
15. Prices are being affected by the drop in the value of Sterling and we are having to implement price increases to reflect our higher costs.
16. Lantoom will continue to operate within Government Guidance and review operations according to the situation.
 
You may contact us through the following methods:

Email:  sales@lantoom.co.uk

Website:  www.lantoom.co.uk

Telephone:  01579 308234

 

Thank you for your business.  Please do not panic.  Please minimise infection risk.  The response to COVID-19 is likely to be long term and we appreciate your help in adapting to the disease risk. 

0 Comments | Posted By Adam Ashman

The world's biggest drystone walling project

Friday, 21 February 2020 10:59:22 Europe/London

The idea

Since 2014 Mark Ellis, a drystone waller, has been creating what will be the largest dry stone wall construction in the world; a dry stone maze in Dalby Forest, Scarborough. Once complete the project will consist of over 4000 tonnes of walling stone.

maze
 

Tools

A nice touch

What’s more, members of the public have been welcomed in to leave there mark on the record breaking maze. A workshop has been running allowing members of the public to carve something in stone, this can be anything from a birth date, a wedding anniversary to a stone in memory of someone special. These stones will be incorporated into the final project.

Get involved

The project is still far from completion, meaning we might have to wait about 3-5 years before we are able to see the impressive project completed. It is sure to look A-maze-ing! For more information or if you are interested in carving your own stone Click here.

Awning
Comments | Posted By Adam Ashman

Tips for keeping your patio in tip top shape during the winter months

Friday, 29 November 2019 11:50:11 Europe/London

Protecting your patio in winter

Though not essential, keeping your patio as protected as possible during the winter months can make the clean up in spring so much more easier. The wet conditions can encourage algae growth; fallen leaves can cause marks on your slabs which can take a fair bit of scrubbing to get off and frost can cause damage to the mortar between the slabs if there is a weakness in the pointing. Here are some things you can do to tackle these common issues.

Paving
 

Raised Beds

Sealant

Sealing a patio can make future cleaning much easier. The sealant protects the slabs from common leaf and algae stains and when the time comes, in Spring, it will make cleaning off these marks much easier.

Awning

Some people may wish to protect there patio with an awning, there are all weather patio paving awnings which are designed to give that little extra protection for your patio during the winter and are also handy during the summer to get away from those unexpected summer showers.

Awning
 

Paving area

Check the pointing

If there is damage to the pointing it can cause a few issues. During the Spring and Summer it can cause weeds to sprout out from the gaps and in the winter it can allow frost in, causing potential damage to more of the mortar or even the slabs themselves. Therefore it might be worth checking over you patio and touching up the mortar if needed. In all good patio maintenance can mean that your patio stays in great conditions for many summers to come.

Comments | Posted By Adam Ashman

5 amazing things to do with your garden space

Thursday, 24 October 2019 13:53:13 Europe/London

1: Rockery

Sometimes less is more when it comes to flowers. But when putting less flowers in the garden there can be large patches of wasted empty earth. Rockery stones can be a great way of using up this space. The stones can make the garden seem more natural and once placed need little to no maintenance.

Rockery
 

Raised Beds

2: Raised garden beds:

Adding levels to your garden can be a great idea, not only does it break up the landscape but it can also allow some of the smaller plants to be seen under the larger ones. If done right it can also work to make the area feel more private.

3: Pond

Who doesn’t love a pond? Weather it is big or small a pond can certainly add a rather tranquil ambiance to your garden. If you wanted to go the extra mile, why not add a small water feature to complete the peaceful feel.

Pond
 

Paving area

4: Patio area

Though grass is lovely, sometimes one needs a place where they can just sit and talk whilst picking up on some of the lovely summer rays. A patio area can be ideal for this. Put a wooden table and chairs out looking across your beautiful garden and relax.

5: Fire-pit

Barbecues are a fantastic social event, great food and fun to be had by all ages. But there always comes the time when the sun starts to go down and the temperature drops forcing the guests to move inside or worse go home. That is the beauty of the fire pit, just light the bad boy up and sit round it with a drink, bliss.

Penrhyn slate quarry
Comments | Posted By Adam Ashman

5 facts about slate

Friday, 11 October 2019 11:15:00 Europe/London

Fact 1:

Spain is the worlds largest producer and exporter of slate. With an astonishing 90% of Europe’s roofing slates originating from Spain.

Spain
 

Switchboard

Fact 2:

Because it is a good electrical insulator and is fireproof, slate was used to construct early 20th century electrical switchboards and relay controls for big electrical motors.

Fact 3:

Slate can be used to make turkey calls a device used by hunters in order to replicate the call of a turkey.

Turkey
 

school board

Fact 4:

In the 18th century Slate was widely used in schools as writing boards. Pupils and teacher would use chalk to write on them.

Fact 5:

And finally: at the end of the nineteenth century Penrhyn Quarry was the world's largest slate quarry; the main pit is nearly 1 mile (1.6 km) long and 1,200 feet (370 metres) deep.

Penrhyn slate quarry
Comments | Posted By Adam Ashman

Choosing the right walling stone

Friday, 14 June 2019 13:50:28 Europe/London

The choice

Choice is good, we love choice. But sometimes when there is so much to choose from picking the right option can be daunting, especially when you may be relatively new to the field. Building a stone wall is no exception. With so many types of stone and so many grades of stone, finding the right stone can be a headache. This article is here to help by asking a few questions to ascertain what option is best for you.

Flint
 

Roman

Style

The first thing to consider is restrictions. Do you have a bed depth limit i.e. can you only allow your stone to go back into the wall 6” (150mm) for instance. Once you have decided what bed depth to go for its time to move on to preference. Are you after a random rubble appearance or something a little more coursed? See example on left.

Narrow it down

Once you have decided these factors its time to decide which stone to go for. Each stone has different colours and properties. At this point it may be worth looking at some of the types of stone available at Lantoom. We have slate, granite, limestone and sandstone walling options, we also have sample panels for those who would like to see the stone in person. Applying all these factors you should come to just 2 or 3 options and from there the choice is up to you. If you still are unsure give us a shout our staff are happy to help.

Hammered granite
Comments | Posted By Adam Ashman

History of quarries in England

Thursday, 30 May 2019 10:40:04 Europe/London

Stone Age

With our reliance on render and brick for building structures, the use of stone and therefore quarries has decreased throughout the modern age, but this wasn’t always the case. If we were to journey back to 4000BC we would find a different story. No, we wouldn’t find Fred Flintstone sliding down a dinosaurs neck whilst screeching Yabadabadoo. Instead we would find the early hunter-gatherers. Stone, namely flint, that was quarried in “The stone age” and was mainly used for hunting and creating tools.

Flint
 

Roman

The Invaders

This trend followed us through 1600 years until we arrived at the bronze age (2400BC approx.) Tin and copper was now our preferred material for creating tools and weapons. Then came the Romans in around (40AD) they brought with them the knowledge of building houses with stone as well as long strait roads. The Romans left after about 400 years and unfortunately so to did a lot of there know-how and technology. Finally when the Normans invaded in (1066AD) they built castles, cathedrals and churches out of stone.

Modern day

This brings us through to the modern day. Stone was such and important part of our history and still plays a key part in creating lasting buildings to this day. It seems stone has lasted the test of time and still proves the best choice when it comes to building a better world.

Hammered granite
0 Comments | Posted By Adam Ashman

Build a better moon

Friday, 8 March 2019 11:19:06 Europe/London

Colonizing

There has been a lot of talk in the last few years about colonizing the moon. Of course this has thrown up a lot of debates - Do we have the right to own parts of the moon? How will we get people there and back? Would it even be worth the effort? As someone who is very interested in stone a questions which springs to my mind when talking about this subject is; what will we build the houses out of?

Bored
 

Rocket

Potential issues

Space travel takes a lot of energy, the heavier the craft the more energy will be needed to get it out of the atmosphere. Stone is by nature heavy and therefore, I find myself asking: would it really be practical to transport such heavy material to the moon?

Reaching for the sky

But if we couldn’t bring stone to the moon then the obvious answer would be to use moonstone. But would moon rock be any good as a building material? Yes actually, cement and concrete can be made out of moon material and would actually be even stronger then the cement and concrete we use back home, this coupled with the lower gravity would mean we could build taller structure then what we are used to on earth, the sky is no longer the limit.

On the moon
Comments | Posted By Adam Ashman

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